A look into…Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, thickening of the myocardium, is the most common genetic cardiovascular disorder. Despite this, little is known about the causes, as such the disease is generally classified under ‘familial’ or ‘sporadic,’ depending whether the mutation was inherited or developed during the patient’s lifetime.

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy can occur at any stage of the lifecycle but has distinct modes of distribution at different ages, for example, post-menopausal women have an increased risk of suffering from this disease. Angina Pectoris is the main indication for symptomatic patients, however general diagnosis can be difficult, as nearly 50% of this patient population is asymptomatic. For the majority of patients this disease is not fatal, but in the cases that it is, the most common cause of death is from sudden cardiac arrest.

This patient segmentation is important for understanding the true size of the specific sub-population in question, and where a forecast or product valuation needs to be generated. This can also be a useful tool in determining the number of patients in your clinical trial population that meet the inclusion criteria of your study.

Due to the genetic component of this disease, there are also great country & regional differences. We have segmented the total eligible population by gene mutation, prognosis and other co-morbidities, such as outflow obstruction and hypertension, generating over 80 sub-populations.

Quick Fact

Did you know in France, in 2010, the difference between the number of patients with a malignant condition from a MYH7 mutation was three times greater than the number of patients with a malignant condition from a TNNI3 mutation?